L'épicerie J.A. Moisan depuis 1871... et ça continue !

“To enter Moisan’s house is to go back in time.”


Make your market in an atmosphere reminiscent of the good old general store with its amenities, antiques, woodwork and melodies of yesteryear. The J.A. Moisan grocery store is a jewel of Quebec City. You will be able to see that the grocery store has never ceased to reflect its past in respect of the elders.

J.A. Moisan is a deli, unique in its kind, a real cave of Ali baba. You’ll see products from around the world and an exceptional showcase of our rural products. Our dynamic team will be happy to introduce you to them.

The grocery store

Make your market in an atmosphere reminiscent of the good old general store with its amenities, antiques, woodwork and melodies of yesteryear. The J.A. Moisan grocery store is a jewel of Quebec City. You will be able to see that the grocery store has never ceased to reflect its past in respect of the elders.

J.A.Moisan is a deli, unique of its kind, a real cave of Ali baba. You’ll see products from around the world and an exceptional showcase of our rural products. Our dynamic team will be happy to introduce you to them.

Our mission

to make yourself known for…

Its unique concept in food, in its region, in Quebec, in Canada, and abroad.

the quality of its products and the exceptional competence of its staff.

by developing a partnership that is always concerned and respectful towards its community.

Mr
J.A. Moisan

J.A. Moisan was born on December 25, 1848, from the marriage of Jean Moisan, a carpenter from the suburb, and Marie Anne Gingras. He grew up in the middle of the suburb of Saint-Jean in The Upper Town of Quebec, where he founded his business in 1871, in this case the J.A. Moisan grocery store, and raised his family there.

In 1885, grocer J.A. Moisan became the owner of the building at 699 Saint-Jean Street. His grocery store was frequented by people of all social classes. There were already rare products, not available at the Berthelot market in Upper Town or at the Finlay market in Lower Town. In 1921, Mr. Moisan purchased the residence next to his business (now the semi-detached at 685 Saint-Jean Street) so that he could expand his store. The expansion project did not materialize. Instead, he converted the first floor into a commercial space and then leased it to the Quebec Liquor Commission.

He died at the age of 78, leaving his second wife, Ludivine Boudreault, and seven children of his first wife, Laetitia Clavet, in mourning. His funeral was held on Easter Monday at his parish church in St. John the Baptist, in the heart of the suburb of Saint John, where he had made a career.

The little story

The J.A. Moisan grocery store is an institution in the commercial and cultural environment of Quebec City. Its recognition goes beyond the city and the province. There is no doubt that his reputation is well established. However, we want to make known and appreciate the potential of this institution through the development of J.A. Moisan, his living environment and the places where he lived with his family in the 19th century.

So we renovated and restored the Moisan family apartments, located above the current grocery store. In addition, we have developed the architectural potential of the place to recall the life and work of J.A. Moisan and his family. A house he himself was inspired by his former owner, Captain John Dick, the retired chief of the cove port at the Foulon de Québec. All this in perspective with the activities of the environment and the time. For example, we offer interested people the opportunity to visit the accommodation of a French-speaking merchant who has been able to make a difference despite the days when the business world was generally reserved for the English-speaking community.

Grocer J.A. Moisan founded his business in 1871 on St. John Street. A renowned grocery store frequented by people of all social classes and offering rare products that were not found at the Berthelot market or the Finlay market in Lower Town. The J.A. Moisan grocery store, the Berthelot market and the Saint-Jean-Baptiste district in which they are located become a source of reference for all the surrounding areas of the Capital.

This venerable institution is a model for the suburb of Saint John, as are other unique buildings and institutions in the neighbourhood such as St. John the Baptist Church, the St. Matthews Library, the Jacques R. Baron Pharmacy, the St. John the Baptist hardware store, R. Bégin butcher shop, bookstores, etc. The J.A. Moisan grocery store is an indispensable and irreplaceable landmark for the neighborhood.

Many testimonials confirm how much locals and outsiders love to frequent the J.A. Moisan grocery store. A place where the warm and present atmosphere cannot be found in the big box stores. The J.A. Moisan grocery store is always a place where people are welcomed and receive courteous and warm service.

It is remarkable that Mr. Moisan, a French-speaking food craftsman, has carved out his place in an English-speaking business environment: those merchants from all over whom we had to rub shoulders to find rare and imported products from various countries.

It is by building on these qualities and this vision that the current owners of the J.A. Moisan grocery store make it their mission to preserve the image of this historic and cultural building and to preserve it for the benefit of all citizens of the neighbourhood.

The Faubourg Saint-Jean

From the beginning of the French regime, the space that would become the suburb of Saint-Jean (the Saint-Jean Baptiste district) was covered with agricultural land. Until 1790, the lands of the Sainte-Geneviève hillside belonged to a few large landowners who exploited them. The Ursulines and the Hôtel-Dieu Hospitals share most of the territory.
In 1792, the suburb of Saint-Jean was included in the quadrangle formed by the streets of Saint-Joachim, Richelieu, the Côte Sainte-Geneviève and the edge of the glacis. At that time, the population was 845. In 1798, St. Olivier Street was added and the population increased to 1,245.

The suburb of Saint John was thus established at the gate of the old town and originated at the site of the Place d’Youville, along the King’s Road. This road, which had become saint-jean street, connected Quebec City with Montreal as early as 1734.

Mr. Moisan spent his childhood in the suburb of Saint-Jean, north of the Upper Town, when Artillery Street was called Artillery Street, St-Michel St-Michael Street and St. John’s Street Without, that is, outside the walls. There is no doubt that Moisan had long dreamed of establishing a business on this busy street.

Between 1815 and 1860, an estimated one million European immigrants landed in Quebec City. Most will settle in Upper Canada and the United States. During this period, the City’s population increased from 15,000 to 50,000. However, a number of immigrants, mostly Irish, made it so high that in 1861, 40 of the citizens of Quebec spoke English. In the St. John the Baptist neighborhood, most Irish people settled on O’Connell, St. Patrick’s and Scott Streets.

A passageway and gateway, St. John Street, one of the oldest streets in the country, has retained these roles while maintaining over time a lively commercial life rooted in the suburban community.
Today, the Saint-Jean Baptiste neighbourhood is still a favourite place for the people of Quebec City and commuters, who come to walk, shop and hang out. Everyone has a pleasant place where you can express yourself in a cultural environment unique in Quebec and Canada. The testimonies of tourists, both European and American, confirm this uniqueness. A simple visit to the J.A. grocery store. Moisan and time to soak up its atmosphere convinces visitors that they are in an exceptional neighborhood.

L'épicerie J.A. Moisan. Depuis 1871. ...et ça continue !

how we

Phone: 1-418-522-0685 — 699 St. John Street,
Quebec, Quebec, G1R 1P7, CANADA
Fax: 1-418-522-2132 — epicerie@jamoisan.com

write to us by filling in the below

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